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Anatomy of Great Blog Post

My buddy Russ Henneberry is a great blogger. And, oh by the way, he’s an outstanding marketing strategist. A few minutes ago, I received an email from Russ with a link to his latest post. Here’s that link:

https://www.tinyandmighty.com/desire-paths

After reading the post, I dropped everything I was doing to write this post. My post explains why I like Russ’ post so much and what you can learn from it. So here are six things that make Russ Henneberry’s latest blog post so darn great:

 

1) It’s short and to the point. The post weighs in at 134 words. But it’s not a light weight. It packs a punch. Too many posts ramble on and on when they could make their point in half the time. The French philosopher Blaise Pascal once ended a letter by apologizing for its length. “I didn’t have enough time to make it shorter,” he said. Funny and true. So many aspiring bloggers worry that they can’t fill the page. In fact, filling the page is not the goal. Making a point and delivering value is the point. If you are like Pascal and so many others — prone to over-write — remember: write shorter. It’s worth the time and effort.

2) The post uses a story to make a point. The post starts, “Legend has it…” Who wouldn’t read on? When you deliver your point through stories, readers pay attention.

3) The post offers excellent tips and advice. Simply put, your content should offer massive value to readers.

4) It describes the benefit you will garner from following the advice. I used to have an uncle who insisted on telling me things I didn’t need to know  (“I’m going to show you how to tie the double sheet bend knot.”) We’ve all been there. Just because you offer advice or show them how, that doesn’t mean they want to know or understand why they should now. Russ takes care of that by writing, “Do this and you’ll increase referrals from and retention of existing customers.”

5) Russ invites interaction. He closes the post by asking, “How do you listen to your customers.” Immediately below the post is a comments section in which people can reply.

6) The post and its promotion reflects cross-channel marketing. I learned about the post from an email he sent me. When I visit the post, I see that it has been tweeted on twitter, liked on Facebook, shared on LinkedIn and “plussed” on Google+. Russ understands how to use different media channels to distribute and promote his content.

If you follow the same approach, you will create concise, compelling content that your readers will value. That means they value and trust you — the writer — and will be more likely to buy from you when they are ready!

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