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The Spam Folder is Not An Email Graveyard

I check the spam folder in my email software regularly because I always find something in there that I want to read. No, I’m not a glutton for punishment; I’m not interested in reading junk mail for fake Rolex watches or little blue pills. The stuff that interests me is stuff that I truly want that my spam folder wrongly designated as “spam.” It happens all the time. Spam filters paint with a broad, inaccurate brush.

 

Just because an email lands in the spam folder, that doesn’t mean it won’t be read. I’m a case in point. I eventually find the email I want to read, whether it lands in the inbox or the spam folder. And I’m not alone. Checking the spam folder is a common practice. If you don’t do it, you should. I guarantee you’ll find emails in there that you wanted to receive.

Just last week, I found emails from my son’s high school in my spam folder.

As an email markerter, I might lose sleep over this — important emails landing in the spam folder. But I don’t worry about it too much. Here’s why:

Last week, a client called to say he was very concerned because a client called to say the client’s emails were landing in the spam folder. We looked into it and noted a few things for the client:

  • His email open rates were as good as ever. 
  • His bounce rates (failed deliveries) were no higher than before. He was getting as many emails through as ever.
  • Among those who opened the email: The recipient who notified him that the email was in the spam folder. OK. The email was in the spam folder, but she found it and opened it anyhow (see above).

Of course, we would prefer that all email gets to the inbox. But it doesn’t. We do all we can to maximize inbox deliveries. We maintain a great reputation among spam filter companies, internet service providers, and delivery reputation monitors. But, as noted above, spam filters still put valid email in the spam folder.

The point of this post is to note that this is not the end of the world. Recipients are still finding your emails, opening them, and responding to them.

 

 

 

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